Chirpy, Chirpy, Cheep, Cheep!

Twitter
image credit: https://pixabay.com/en/tweet-twitter-bird-blue-twig-155281/

I’ve just been looking at Twitter Usage Statistics.

Every second, on average, around 6,000 tweets are tweeted on Twitter.

That’s over 350,000 tweets sent per minute,

500 million tweets per day

and around 200 billion tweets per year.

So how in that great crowd can you get your tweets noticed?

In a very interesting article on the Meet Edgar website we’re told:

Basically, every time you tweet, you’re throwing a dart at a board, blindfolded.

But, if you read down to the end of the article there’s some useful advice to help get your tweets noticed.

The 3 key points are to do with

Timing

Scheduling

and Repetition.

To help with Timing use your Twitter Analytics. (On your home page, if you’re lucky, it’s the little box on the right hand side titled Your Tweet Activity. Just keep an eye on this for a few days and plot the times when your tweets get most engagement.)

Once you’ve got some idea of your best tweeting times use a scheduler to make sure you post your tweets at the times they’re most likely to get seen. I use Tweetdeck which is free and easy to use.

If you’ve read Meet Edgar’s article you’ll have some idea of how few users are going to see your tweets. So, use your scheduler to post your tweet a few times. The likelihood of the same person seeing your repeated tweet isn’t great, is it?

Have fun!

Chirpy, Chirpy, Cheep, Cheep!

Thanks for reading my blog today.

By Catherine Murray

For over thirty years I worked in British primary education as a class teacher and then as head teacher of four different schools. I retired early about ten years ago and have developed an interest in e-publishing as well as writing. In addition to my own books, I've published several novels written by my husband, Michael Murray. These include the best selling detective novel "A Single To Filey: a DCI Tony Forward novel". When not writing and e-publishing I enjoy family history, reading, gardening, country walks, music, films etc. A diagnosis of advanced colorectal cancer in mid-2017 was followed by 30 months of chemotherapy and two major operations in 2020. Our wonderful NHS has put me well on the road to recovery and I'm hoping to be cancer free for many years to come. I'm everlastingly grateful to my family and friends, especially my husband Michael, for their love and support.