Auld Lang Syne #HappyNewYear

new year

I’ve lived

the whole of my sixty plus years never knowing what “auld lang syne” really meant.

I’ve got the gist of the words but not their literal meaning.

So here, courtesy of Wikipedia, is the explanation.

Auld Lang Syne is a Scots poem written by Robert Burns in 1788 and set to the tune of a traditional folk song.

The song’s Scots title may be translated into standard English as “old long since”, or more idiomatically, “long long ago”, “days gone by” or “old times”.

Consequently, “For auld lang syne”, as it appears in the first line of the chorus, might be loosely translated as “for (the sake of) old times”.

So, now I know!

And still time to learn all five verses before the clock strikes midnight.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and auld lang syne*?
CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my jo,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stoup!
and surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.
CHORUS

We twa hae run about the braes,
and pou’d the gowans fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,
sin’ auld lang syne.
CHORUS

We twa hae paidl’d in the burn,
frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
sin’ auld lang syne.
CHORUS

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!
and gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak’ a right gude-willie waught,
for auld lang syne.
CHORUS

Sixty years ago these New Year revellers at the Chelsea Arts Ball had time for Auld Lang Syne along with the Conga and some flamboyant Jiving.

Hope you have a very enjoyable New Year’s Eve

and all best wishes for 2018.

new year
image credit: https://pixabay.com/en/new-year-2018-numbers-digit-design-2841111/

 

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