Great 1970 Biba video

Interesting insights into the Biba way of design and sales in this film clip.

Fascinating interview with Barbara Hulanicki.

Wish I’d kept the Biba mail order catalogue I sent for in 1969!

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Swinging Sixties Icons

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A 70s look at the Sixties

Mary Quant

There’s an interesting interview with Mary Quant in the middle of this film

and some great Sixties shots to start with

but the last part of the film can only be described as bizarre.

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Crazy furniture from the 1960s

1960s

I can’t say we had any furniture like this in our house in the Swinging Sixties.

But the chair which almost falls over looks fun.

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The beautiful English village of Leefdale seems reassuringly tranquil. But appearances can be deceptive.

Sharon guards a dark family secret.

Barbara is fighting to save her marriage.

Zoe is trying to sort her life out.

Louise is desperate to be recognised for who she truly is . . .

Interesting Interview with Twiggy

sculpture

Following on from

Swinging Sixties Icons

this is an interesting interview with Lesley Hornby aka Twiggy in which she hints at a movie career.

And we all know what happened next.

But I couldn’t remember if Twiggy had made any other films, so quick Wiki search to see what else she was in:

The Boy Friend (1971)
W (1974)
There Goes The Bride (1979)
The Blues Brothers (1980)
The Doctor and the Devils (1985)
Club Paradise (1986)
The Little Match Girl (1986)
Madame Sousatzka (1988)
The Diamond Trap (1988)
Sun Child (1988)
Istanbul (Keep Your Eyes Open) (1990)
Body Bags (1993)
Something Borrowed, Something Blue (1997)
Edge of Seventeen (1998)
Brand New World (based on the Jeff Noon play Woundings) (1998)

And then there’s the M&S adverts.

 

Well done Twiggy.

She’ll be 70 next year.

Truly a Sixties Icon.

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Leefdale
More details and a free sample to read at http://amzn.eu/hXgGQ6b

Top of the Pops January 1964

Dave Clark 5

Top of the Pops started in 1964 and this is how the show opened.

According to number-ones The Animals were at the top of the charts with “House of the Rising Sun” in July 1964 so presumably this clip was from then.

The BBC TOTP website says the show started on New Year’s Day 1964 but the film of the first show is lost.

The Dave Clark Five were at Number 1 in January 1964 with “Glad All Over” which, at the time, I thought was dreadful. Listening to it now, it’s quite jolly but unfortunately it stays in your head for hours so approach with caution!

The only other DC5 song I can recall is “Bits and Pieces” which I disliked even more than “Glad All Over”.  It’s still really awful but this clip is hilarious and there are some good shots of Chelsea boots.

The Dave Clark Five originated from Tottenham, North London and the band was founded in 1957 but disbanded in 1970.

And after the breakup in 1970?

Wikipedia records that Dave Clark (drums) was also the band’s manager and producer of their recordings. Following the group’s break-up, he set up a media company. In the process, he acquired the rights to the 1960s pop series Ready Steady Go!. Additionally, he wrote and produced the 1986 London stage musical Time – The Musical where he directed the last performance of Sir Laurence Olivier. The production was seen by an audience of over one million and a two-disc vinyl album was released in conjunction with the stage production. Mike Smith (keyboard) returned to performing in 2003 after a hiatus of 25 years. He formed Mike Smith’s Rock Engine and did two mini-tours of the U.S. He died on 28 February 2008 in London from a spinal injury sustained after scaling a fence at his home in Spain. Denis Payton (sax, harmonica and guitar) died on 17 December 2006 at the age of 63 after a long battle with cancer. Rick Huxley (guitar) died from emphysema on 11 February 2013 at the age of 72. Lenny Davidson (guitar) taught guitar for many years at a school in Cambridgeshire, where he still lives. The Dave Clark Five were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2008.

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Visiting London in the 1950s

London

This film clip of a drive round London in the 1950s is a little gem. The film has been enhanced and stabilised and has a lovely piano accompaniment.

Apparently the route is:

Kensington High Street

Allen Street

Abingdon Street

Phillimore Gardens

Upper Phillimore Gardens

Kensington High Street

Argyll Road

Phillimore Gardens again.

In the 1950s my family went on a visit to London. We stayed for three nights in a B&B in South Kensington.

We did all the sights and had a day at London Zoo where we saw the famous Chimps Tea Party. Four chimpanzees were taken by their keepers to sit at a picnic table and drink tea and eat sandwiches, cakes and lollipops. The highlight, of course, was when one of the chimps drank straight out of the teapot. The chimps didn’t seem to mind being the source of so much public amusement and at least they weren’t wearing dresses which was what happened when you saw chimps at the circus.

We went to look at Buckingham Palace and the Houses of Parliament which we recognised from the H.P. Sauce bottle.

HP sauce
image credit: By ChrisDC62 [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, from Wikimedia Commons
We went to see the Tower of London and threw pennies to the mudlarks at the foot of Tower Bridge; admired lots of paintings in the National Gallery; fed the ducks in St. James’ Park and the pigeons in Trafalgar Square. We also paid our respects to the Unknown Soldier in Westminster Abbey.

In the summer of 1965 we visited London again. This time to the BBC Proms at the Royal Albert Hall. The excitement of London now that it was Swinging was even greater than before. We had a day ticket and caught the train from Peterborough railway station and were in the capital a couple of hours later.

Our dad decided that our education would benefit from an immersion in art and we spent much of the day in the National Gallery. The highlight of the visit was seeing the Leonardo Cartoon which had been purchased a couple of years earlier by the gallery after a well-publicised appeal for donations.

Leonardo cartoon
image credit: [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Then after a brisk walk round St James’ Park and a Lyons Corner House for something to eat and we headed to South Kensington for the concert.

The programme for the concert was:

Neville Marriner directing the Academy of St Martin in the Fields in a Handel concerto. The premiere of Michael Tippett’s piano concerto conducted by the composer with John Ogden as soloist. After the interval Malcolm Sargent conducted the BBC Symphony Orchestra and the BBC Singers in a performance of Gustav Holst’s The Planets.

At the time we loved The Planets and didn’t mind the Handel. However we hated the Tippett and couldn’t wait for it to finish. Listening to it again over fifty years later, I’ve enjoyed it!

Thanks for reading my blog today.

You can read more of my memories from the 1950s and 60s in Cabbage and Semolina and Jam for Tea available in ebook for Kindle and paperback.

C&S pink
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